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TODAY'S THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW

1. TODAY ON HOUSE FLOOR: MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE BILL AND ANOTHER ANTI-2A BILL

House Bill 31: Phased-in Minimum Wage Increase

House Bill 83: Extreme Risk Protection Act

The Republican Party of New Mexico opposes both of these bills.

2. ALSO TODAY: TWO ELECTION RELATED BILLS TO BE HEARD IN HOUSE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE

House Bill 84: Auto Voter Registration at MVD & Elsewhere

This bill would change rules at the MVD; instead of giving voters the option to register to vote or change voting registration, this legislation would automatically register driver’s license applicants and change voter registration information, ”unless the applicant specifically declines to register or to update the applicant’s voter registration during the application process.”

House Bill 86: Election Day & Early Voting Registration

As the name of this bill implies, it would allow voters to register to vote at polling locations on Election Day and also during the early voting period.
The Republican Party of New Mexico opposes both of these bills.

3. ANTI-AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY LEGISLATION HEARD EARLIER TODAY

House Bills 204 and 332 were heard in the House Agriculture & Water Resources Committee earlier today.

These bills are yet another example of Democrat overreach to place onerous regulations on New Mexico’s agriculture industry and thus hurt our state’s competitiveness

RPNM encourages you to contact members of the Agriculture Committee and let them know you oppose both of these bills.


4. ICYMI - RECREATIONAL POT BILL PASSES FIRST HURDLE IN HOUSE

On Saturday House Bill 356, the Cannabis Regulation Act, passed its first hurdle in the House Health and Human Services Committee.

Committee members voted 5-2 along party lines (Republicans opposed); the bill now heads to the House Judiciary Committee.

Employers have voiced opposition to the bill as it restricts their ability to enforce a drug-free workplace.

“This would create a nightmare for employers who value drug-free and safe workplaces because they would not be able to enforce workplace safety rules,” said Rob Black, CEO of NMACI.