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Editorial

Editorial content. Content posted here may or may not reflect the opinions of the Beat. They reflect the opinions of the author.

By Paul J. Gessing

According to the website Nerdwallet, New Mexico has the 7th-highest percentage of “unbanked” households among US states. That means that 11 percent of New Mexico families don’t have access to bank accounts.

That same report estimated that New Mexico households lose between $40 and $104 million annually in fees and expenses due to being unbanked. Even for many New Mexicans who do have bank accounts, the geographical size and sparse nature of our population makes it difficult for many in our State to get to a bank in a timely fashion.

This morning, Power The Future Western States Director Larry Behrens takes a closer look at how the Public Service Company of New Mexico plans to regulate the state’s controversial Energy Transition Act, and how a peek behind the curtain reveals a closed-door process that is putting New Mexico ratepayers at risk.

Albuquerque Journal: Larry Behrens: PNM, eco-left pulled one over on ratepayers
New Mexico’s energy workers and ratepayers deserve to know the truth.

By NM Supreme Court Justice Shannon Bacon

 We all know that anybody accused of a crime has the right to legal representation and that if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you. But being provided a lawyer is not a right, nor is a lawyer guaranteed in civil legal cases even though these types of cases can change the course of a person’s life and have severe life consequences.

Civil legal cases—anything that’s not criminal—can involve eviction, child custody and guardianship, veteran’s benefits, consumer debt, and restraining orders against an abusive partner. When it comes to essential legal matters, people deserve access to resources to help them through the process. Injustices occur when people do not have access to the help they need. People can become homeless, lose benefits, or lose their children.

Op-Ed by Raúl Montaño Ayala
Researcher and Scholar
Rio Grande Foundation

Amid New Mexico's boom in oil tax revenues, legislators have contemplated ways to put these surplus funds to work for the Land of Enchantment. During the last session the Legislature grew spending by 11%. They raised taxes, doubled the State’s film subsidy program, and created an outdoor division, among many big-spending ideas. When taken together the 2019 session resulted in a massive expansion of government.

What our State really needs is not more government spending. Instead it needs policies that foster entrepreneurship. What legislators need to do is promote laissez faire, free market policies that allow business to thrive and make our State more attractive to companies and residents and therefore more prosperous.

luis

Something is stirring in Grant County, New Mexico. In our part of the state, Democratic candidates have enjoyed guaranteed votes for decades. However, a new day is dawning, as Grant County may be turning into one of many New Mexico “rogue counties” after realizing the progressive agenda pushed in Santa Fe. They see an agenda pushed by the current elected leadership that is in direct conflict with their deeply held personal beliefs. They are realizing their party took a radical left turn away from what they hold dear.

Most lifelong residents of Grant County would describe themselves as blue collar Democrats who value family, faith, and living a New Mexican way of life. They are not ashamed of being hardworking and patriotic.

By Paul Gessing

New Mexico has a golden opportunity right now. The discovery of incredible oil riches in the Southeastern part of our State is not just a once-in-a-generation opportunity. Rather, it is the kind of thing that happens only rarely in the history of any state or nation. It is the kind of opportunity that we simply cannot let slip through our fingers.

Thanks to new discoveries in the Permian Basin New Mexico has seen oil production triple since 2012. It will likely double again by 2021. That is great news and it has boosted New Mexico’s sluggish economy. In May, for the first time since 2013, the State’s job growth exceeded the national average.

Op Ed by:
Ethics Commissioners Stuart M. Bluestone, Hon. Garrey C. Carruthers, Dr. Judy Villanueva and Frances F. Williams

Wanted: State Ethics Commissioners

SANTA FE — The new State Ethics Commission is looking for New Mexicans interested in serving on the Commission. We are the four new Commissioners appointed by the Democratic and Republican leaders of the New Mexico Legislature. The recently enacted State Ethics Commission Act requires the four of us to appoint two more Commissioners, and we are seeking letters of application or nomination for those positions. The main responsibility of the Commission is to help oversee, provide guidance about and enforce provisions of the State's ethics laws as they apply to State Executive and Legislative branch officers, employees, candidates, lobbyists and government contractors.

NM House Republican Leader James Townsend (R-Artesia)

This Independence Day holiday, while many of us will celebrate with backyard barbeques and neighborhood fireworks, bureaucrats in Santa Fe will be busy updating their accounting codes to prepare for the influx of new tax revenue. It will be a happy time for fans of big government.

I can’t imagine that our country’s founding fathers envisioned the current governing reality in our state. The Revolutionary generation built our country on the principles of limited government and individual freedom. They enshrined our right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness in the very document that declared our independence as a self-governing nation.

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Editor's Note

Check out a new column that will talk about the town of Silver City and its news and services. 

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The Beat has a column for you gardeners out there. The Grant County Extension Service will bring you monthly columns on gardening issues. The first one posted is on Winterizing your houseplants and patio plants.

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