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Non-Local News Releases

This category will feature news releases from out-of-area government agencies and representatives, as well as events that are not taking place in the four-county area of Grant, Catron, Hidalgo or Luna. For those events please visit Local News Releases.

Help for Parents of Children who Stutter is as Close as Your Library

Thanks to some generous donations, the Stuttering Foundation has donated a new DVD, entitled Kids Who Stutter: Parents Speak, to 8,800 public libraries across the country.

In this 16 minute DVD, parents and speech-language experts talk about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their children. The professionals offer simple tips that parents can follow easily.

The DVD features some of the world's leading therapists with children who stutter: Lisa A Scott, Ph.D. of the Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, Willie Botterill, MSc, and Elaine Kelman, MSc., from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

"This is an important tool for families and teachers of children who stutter," added Jane Fraser, president of the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation. "Our latest DVD is designed to give parents and teachers the tools they need to play a vital role in the process of helping children who stutter."

For more information about stuttering write the 70-year-old nonprofit Stuttering Foundation, PO Box 11749; Memphis, TN 38111-0749, call 800-992-9392, or visit www.stutteringhelp.org.

A library that will shelve any of the free materials the foundation offers to public libraries can email info@stutteringhelp.org or call 800-992-9392.

PHOENIX — As teachers, administrators and aides have launched into their fall semester, taxes may not be on the top of their list. However, knowing what to keep track of now can help reduce the burden at tax time. The Internal Revenue Service reminds educators that there are three key work-related tax benefits that may help them reduce what they pay in taxes.

Educators can take advantage of tax deductions for qualified expenses related to their profession. The costs many educators incur out-of-pocket include items such as classroom supplies, training and travel.

PHOENIX — The Internal Revenue Service has provided temporary relief from certain requirements of the Internal Revenue Code to allow owners and operators of low-income housing projects located anywhere in the United States and its possessions to provide temporary emergency housing to individuals who are displaced by a major disaster from their principal residences, regardless of income.

This special relief detailed in Revenue Procedure 2014-49 and Revenue Procedure 2014-50 authorizes owners and operators, in conjunction with agencies and issuers, to disregard the income limits, transience rules and certain other restrictions that normally apply to low-income housing units when providing temporary emergency housing to displaced individuals. As a result, owners and operators can offer temporary emergency housing to displaced individuals who lived in a county or other local jurisdiction designated for individual assistance by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Currently, this includes parts of Texas, Florida, Georgia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, though FEMA may add other locations in the future. Upon approval, emergency housing can be provided for up to a year after the close of the month in which the major disaster was declared by the President.

trevor scott rsNew Mexico State University Rodeo athletes Trevor Scott, left, and Bethanie Shofner compete in the team roping event at the Douglas, Arizona, college rodeo. (NMSU photo by Savannah Montero)WRITER: Savannah Montero, 575-646-1614, smontero@nmsu.edu

Hot, dry, windy weather, faces covered in dirt, and the New Mexico State University rodeo team still came out with a bang.

(Santa Fe, NM) - Ten bills that Governor Susana Martinez attempted to veto earlier this year became law today after Santa Fe District Court Judge Sarah Singleton denied Gov. Martinez's request to delay their implementation. The Court held that the Governor's request is not likely to succeed if it is appealed, and that the public interest is best served by allowing those bills to become law. The First Judicial District Court's decision in favor of the Legislature's lawsuit to invalidate ten vetoes by Governor Susana Martinez during the 2017 Regular Session was cheered by sponsors of the ten contested bills.

"This is a win for every New Mexico kid and the future of our state's economy. This legislation opens the door to computer science education for high schoolers across the state, giving them the tools to compete in a 21st century, new collar economy. I'm glad it is finally the law of the land," said Senator Jacob Candelaria. SB 134, sponsored by Sen. Jacob Candelaria and Rep. Debra M. Sariñana, will permit high school students to count computer science courses toward the math or science credits needed to graduate.

PHOENIX — Farmers and ranchers who previously were forced to sell livestock due to drought in an applicable region now have an additional year to replace the livestock and defer tax on any gains from the forced sales, according to the Internal Revenue Service. An applicable region is a county designated as eligible for federal assistance plus counties contiguous to that county.

This relief generally applies to capital gains realized by eligible farmers and ranchers on sales of livestock held for draft, dairy or breeding purposes. Sales of other livestock, such as those raised for slaughter or held for sporting purposes, or poultry are not eligible.

Truth or Consequences—The first announced New Mexico Congressional District 2 Democratic Candidates Forum will be held in Truth or Consequences on November 16 at 7 p.m.

All five persons vying to win the CD2 Democratic primary nod for Congress—David Alcon, David Baake, Ron Fitzherbert, Mad Hildebrandt and Tony Martinez—will appear on the same stage to present their platforms and answer questions from the audience and forum moderator Fred Martino, director of content at KRWG public radio and TV in Las Cruces.

Washington, D.C. — U.S. Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) along with U.S. Representatives Gwen Moore (D-WI), Don Young (R-AK), Rick Nolan (D-MN), Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), Colleen Hanabusa (D-HI), Denny Heck (D-WA), Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK), and Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) introduced H.R. 3864, the reauthorization of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act (NAHASDA), to increase access to safe and affordable housing for Native Americans across the nation.

"Prosperity and opportunity have eluded Native American families on tribal lands for too long. From increased access to quality housing, to lease-to-own programs aimed at providing rural tribes with the resources and flexibility to develop modern communities, NAHASDA assists tribes in meeting the unique housing challenges of each community with independence and self-choice. These reforms provide faster approval of projects, allowing tribes to focus on economic development and innovation rather than administrative processes. The bill also reduces inefficiencies within government spending, and ultimately aids some of the most vulnerable communities in our country with real opportunity to improve. I thank my colleagues in the House and Senate who have worked with me in a truly bipartisan, bicameral effort to reduce the burden on tribes and expand opportunity in Native American housing. By working across the aisle and with tribal leaders nationwide, we are helping to lay the foundation for real, concrete reforms needed in tribal communities," stated Rep. Pearce.

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Editor's Note

The Grant county Beat continues to bring you new columnists. New this past week are the Christian Corner, for those who are already Christians or are exploring the beliefs.

The second is a business-centered column—Your Business Connection by the New Mexico Business Coalition. The group works to make policy in the state of New Mexico better for all businesses, large and small.

The Beat has a new column for you gardeners out there. The Grant County Extension Service will bring you monthly columns on gardening issues. The first one posted is on Winterizing your houseplants and patio plants.

The Beat totally appreciates its readers!  

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