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Immigration Matters

The items posted in this column are provided by George Taylor, a retired Border Patrol agent.

Daniel Horowitz · December 9, 2019  
 
https://www.conservativereview.com/news/trump-must-add-saudi-arabia-middle-eastern-countries-travel-ban-list/

https://arizonadailyindependent.com/2019/12/05/former-drug-cartel-scout-kills-cartel-member-sent-to-mesa-to-assassinate-him/

December 5, 2019 ADI Staff Reporter

 Daniel Villalobos-Espinoza, a former drug cartel scout, was arrested by Mesa Police after he killed the cartel member sent to assassinate him. Villalobos-Espinoza killed fellow cartel member Carlos Osuna-Apodaca on November 30, 2019.

Villalobos-Espinoza, was arrested by Mesa Police on December 4, 2019, at 557 S. Olive #A, and charged with first-degree murder in the death of Osuna-Apodaca.

A hearing will take place in Boston on Dec 2 to pass Sanctuary Law statewide Massachusetts

Attached is NAFBPO written submission concerning passage of such a law and expected outcomes.

November 25, 2019

TO: Executive & Legislative Branch
Massachusetts State Government
Boston, Massachusetts

FROM: Zack Taylor, Chairman
National Association of Former Border Patrol Officers
PO Box 4012
Rio Rico, Arizona 85648

We understand that Massachusetts is considering a statute to bring Immigration Sanctuary to the entire State, and we have been asked to offer our view of what that could mean realistically. Having several hundred years of combined experience in the field of American Immigration and being a nonpartisan organization, we will be relatively brief in our commentary in comparison to the magnitude of the issue.

https://fraudscrookscriminals.com/2019/11/22/pennsylvania-police-african-american-vietnam-vet-run-over-and-killed-by-drunk-mexican/

More than 100,000 illegal immigrants who requested a special Obama-era amnesty for adults who came to the U.S. as children have criminal histories, according to an alarming report released this month by the government. Offenses committed by the illegal aliens seeking protection, benefits and rights under the policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) include murder, rape, weapon and assault charges. DACA has shielded nearly 800,000 illegal aliens under the age of 31 from deportation and allowed them to obtain work permits and drivers licenses. Obama launched the outrageous measure through executive order in 2012 to help children who came to the U.S. “through no fault of their own.” The Trump administration tried to end DACA in 2017 but open borders groups sued to keep it going and now the Supreme Court is set to decide the matter.

Weeks earlier, Senate declared: ‘No emergency on the border.”

November 7, 2019
Michael Cutler

https://cms.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2019/11/when-mexican-cartels-slaughter-americans-michael-cutler

On November 5, 2019 ABC News reported, Horrific details emerge in killing of 9 US citizens, including 6 children, in ambush in Mexico.

Once again it appears that the violent Mexican drug cartels have committed a horrific mass murder. Their tactics could have been taken from the playbook of ISIS or al Qaeda. Initially news reports expressed the possibility that the killers may have mistaken those killed for members of an adversary cartel. However, the facts don’t support it. Children, including infants were among those shot and burned while strapped into their car seats.

https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fclaireberlinski.substack.com%2Fp%2Fon-mexican-state-collapse-a-guest&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cbdd0d59f59a94ee572e708d756617ab7%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637072848975634245&sdata=4DeHa8iF1Ac1QlL%2BifY1CvjwitmdtBqRgDnaJXC1EKE%3D&reserved=0

You may have read the news just a few days back: the Mexican military captured not one but two of El Chapo’s sons in the heart of Culiacán, the Sinaloan capital. One son freed himself—which is to say his entourage and retainers at hand overpowered and killed the soldiers at hand—and then, in a decisive riposte, seized the entire city center of Culiacán to compel the liberation of his brother.

The forces that emerged were in the literal sense awesome and awful. Heavy weaponry that would be familiar on any Iraqi, Syrian, or Yemeni battlefield was brought to bear. More and worse: custom-built armored vehicles, designed and built to make a Sahel-warfare technical look like an amateur’s weekend kit job, were rolled out for their combat debut. Most critically, all this hardware was manned by men with qualities the Mexican Army largely lacks: training, tactical proficiency, and motivation.

Then the coup de grace: as the Chapo sons’ forces engaged in direct combat with their own national military, kill squads went into action across Culiacán, slaughtering the families of soldiers engaged in the streets.

Cowed and overmatched—most crucially in the moral arena—the hapless band of soldiers still holding the second son finally received word from Mexico City, direct from President AMLO himself: surrender. Surrender and release the prisoner.

It’s an absolutely extraordinary episode even by the grim and bizarre annals of what we mistakenly call the post-2006 Mexican Drug War. The Battle of Culiacán stands on a level above, say, the Ayotzinapa massacre, or the Zetas’ expulsion of the entire population of Ciudad Mier. Killing scores of innocents and brutalizing small towns is one thing: seizing regional capital cities and crushing the national armed forces in open fighting in broad daylight is something else.

“Drug War” is a misnomer for reasons the Culiacán battle lays bare. This is not a mafia-type problem, nor one comprehensible within the framework of law enforcement and crime. This is something very much like an insurgency now—think of the eruption of armed resistance in Culiacán in 2019 as something like that in Sadr City in 2004—and also something completely like state collapse. The cartels may be the proximate drivers but they are symptoms. Underlying them is a miasma of official corruption, popular alienation, and localist resentments—and underlying all that is a low-trust civil society stripped of the mediating mechanisms that make peaceable democracy both feasible and attractive.

Note as an aside that the cartels are not even necessarily drug-trafficking-specific entities. There have been ferocious and bloody cartel battles—against one another, against the state—for control of economic interests ranging from port operations to the avocado crop to lime exports. Illegal drugs supercharge their resources and ambitions, but absent them and that illegality they would simply assume another form.

I want to pause here and be explicit: none of this is an argument that Mexicans are incapable of liberality and democracy. The millions of Mexicans in the United States illustrate the contrary quite well, and localist democratic structures in Mexico proper are often of the sort that would make a communitarian conservative’s heart swell with pride. What is argued here is that Culiacán illuminates that the Mexican state as constituted is incompetent to that end.

Simply put, we can understand the past two centuries of Mexican history as a cyclic alternation between chaotic liberality and pluralism on the one hand, and orderly (if corrupt) autocracy on the other. The orderly and corrupt Porfiriato was followed by the horrors of civil war unleashed by Madero, followed in turn by the “perfect dictatorship” of the PRI, followed in turn by this century’s emergence of true Mexican multiparty democracy—and therefore the disintegration of the state we see now.

This is important because Americans have not had to think seriously about this for nearly a century: there is a place on the map marked Mexico, but much of it is governed by something other than the Mexican state. That’s been true for years.

The Battle of Culiacán, government surrender and all, made it open and explicit.

What happens now, barring an exceedingly unlikely discovery of spine and competence by the government in Mexico City, is more and worse. The country is on a trajectory toward warlordism reminiscent of, say, 1930s China or its own 1910s. Some of those warlords will be the cartels. Some of them will be virtuous local forces genuinely on the side of order and justice—for example the autodefensa citizen militias of Michoacán. Some of them will be the official state, grasping for what it can. Some of them, given sufficient time, will be autonomous or even secessionist movements: look to Chiapas, Morelia, et al., for that.

The lines between all these groups will be hazy and easily crossed. None will be mutually exclusive from the others.

It is tragic and a pity, because Mexico has in fact mastered the forms if not the substance of democratic civics. It is a shame because much of the Mexican diaspora in the United States is transmitting back home ideas of natural rights and a virtuous armed citizenry—right at the moment we ourselves have stopped believing in those things. (This has been a significant driver of the autodefensa phenomenon.) It is a loss because, depending on how you measure it, México just this decade tipped into a majority middle-class society for the first time in its history. In regions like the Bajío, advanced manufacturing is taking root and a class of engineers is slowly changing the old ways.

In the midst of a human rights crisis and violent pro-democracy manifestations in China, Judicial Watch has obtained records that expose a troubling partnership between a public American university and the Chinese Communists at the heart of the abuses. The records show that the University of Arizona (UA), a taxpayer-funded institution with an enrollment of about 44,000, paid $100,000 to launch a Confucius Institute on its Tucson campus more than a decade ago and subsequently dedicated nearly $2 million and other public resources to keep it going. Confucius Institutes were founded by the Chinese government and are managed by China’s Ministry of Education to spread Communist ideas. FBI Director Christopher Wray has warned in congressional testimony that Confucius Institutes provide a platform to disseminate Chinese Communist Party propaganda, encourage censorship and restrict academic freedom.

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